Student Athletes Emulate the Pros in Abusing Prescription Painkillers

Student Athletes Emulate the Pros in Abusing Prescription Painkillers

Student Athletes Emulate the Pros in Abusing Prescription PainkillersSometimes we’re so caught up in all the pro sports stars whose lives have been wrecked by misusing prescription painkillers that we forget the problem extends down to the amateur level.
And, yes, that does mean college and even high-school sports.
At least one study put the number of college student athletes who’ve used prescription medications to enhance their performance at as high as 53.3 percent. And another recent study on high school athletes, published online in the Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse, reported that 12 percent of male seniors and 8 percent of female seniors admitted to abusing painkillers.
To former ESPN.com columnist Gregg Easterbrook — who wrote about painkillers in his book “The King of Sports: Football’s Impact on America — it’s no surprise that the largest percentage of those young abusers play football.
“Youth and high-school players see an example that appears to be of men so tough, they laugh at pain,” he wrote. “The message sent is that young players should use their own bodies recklessly.”
So what’s a concerned parent to do?
Well, if your child is experiencing neuro-musculoskeletal-related pain from playing sports– spinal pain, say, from too many tackles or strained soccer kicks –first know that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last March began urging physicians to avoid prescribing opioids for chronic pain in response to a record high 28,647 deaths involving the highly addictive drugs in 2014.
Know, too, that the most popular non-pharmacologic alternative to routine care is drug-free chiropractic care.
“Doctors of chiropractic play a key role in sports health care by providing hands-on care that help improve range of motion, flexibility, muscle strength, and other key performance factors,” notes the not-for-profit Foundation for Chiropractic Progress‘ Sherry McAlliste

Are You At Risk of Having a Fatal Brain Aneurysm?
Sponsored News – – It should have been a day like any other for Lisa Colagrossi, a New York City journalist for WABCChannel 7. She should have reported the news and returned home to her family. Instead, on March 20, 2015, the 49-year-old mother of two, died from a ruptured brain aneurysm.
Unlike cancer and other diseases, little is known of this deadly condition. In Lisa’s case, she was experiencing one of the classic warning signs of a brain aneurysm — the worst headache of her life — but it was not recognized as a possible aneurysm. This overall lack of knowledge is what prompted Colagrossi’s husband, Todd Crawford, to create The Lisa Colagrossi Foundation (TLCF), a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating awareness of and education about the signs, symptoms, and risk factors for brain aneurysms.
A brain aneurysm is a weakness or thinning of the wall of a blood vessel in the brain. Eventually, the blood vessel wall begins to bulge outward. This may cause a leak or rupture and result in bleeding into the brain.
The most common signs and symptoms of brain aneurysms include the sudden onset of the following:
* Worst headache of your life
* Sensitivity to light
* Stiff neck
* Sharp pain behind one of your eyes
* State of confusion
A number of factors can contribute to the development of a brain aneurysm. Some risk factors develop over time, while some are present at birth. Common risk factors include:
* High Blood Pressure
* Smoking
* Head Injury
* Older Age
* Drug/Alcohol Abuse
* Family History
In addition, women and African Americans are nearly 50 percent more likely to develop a brain aneurysm.
For its part, The Foundation has been credited with saving several lives since its inception in September 2015.
One such survivor was suffering from a sudden excruciating headache. After her sister heard Crawford on the radio speaking about his work with TLCF and the signs, symptoms and risk factors of a brain aneurysm, she urged her to go to the hospital. Multiple CAT scans, one spinal tap, and six weeks later, she had lifesaving brain surgery in which two aneurysms were clipped.
Currently, an estimated 6 to 15 million people have a brain aneurysm, with an estimated 40,000 ruptures occurring every year. Of those, over 60 percent will die, and of those who survive, over 66 percent will suffer major neurological deficits.
“Brain aneurysms don’t need to result in a tragic loss,” says Crawford. “The more people that are aware of the signs, symptoms, and risk factors that accompany a brain aneurysm, the more lives that will be saved.”
For more information

Here’s Why You Really Get Tech Neck

Here’s Why You Really Get Tech Neck

Imagine four 15-pound bowling balls atop your head, and you’ll understand why so many people now suffer from “tech neck.” Yep, the equivalent of about 60 pounds is added to the stress on your neck every time you look down at some wireless device — think texting, for example — potentially resulting in everything from headaches to back, shoulder, neck and arm pain.
Key to avoiding the condition? Proper posture (including chin up) — which doctors of chiropractic increasingly find themselves advising patients on, says the not-for-profit Foundation for Chiropractic Progress, in addition to treating spinal alignment issues.

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